Feb19
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History of Copper

Company News, Recycling Acts & Stats

Copper has been an essential material to man since pre-historic times. In fact, one of the major “ages” or stages of human history is named for a copper alloy, bronze. Copper and its many alloys have played an important role in many civilizations, from the ancient Egyptians, Romans to modern day cultures around the world. Here, you will find a number of reference materials detailing the role that copper has played throughout human civilization for thousands of years.

Copper in the USA: Bright Future – Glorious Past

Copper was first used by man over 10,000 years ago. A copper pendant discovered in what is now northern Iraq has been dated about 8700 B.C. For nearly five millennia copper was the only metal known to man, and thus had all the metal applications.

Early copper artifacts, first decorative, then utilitarian, were undoubtedly hammered out from “native copper,” pure copper found in conjunction with copper-bearing ores in a few places around the world. By 5000 BC, the dawn of metallurgy had arrived, as evidence exists of the smelting of simple copper oxide ores such as malachite and azurite.

Not until about 4000 BC did gold appear on the scene as man’s second metal. By 3000 B.C., silver and lead were being used and the alloying of copper had begun, first with arsenic and then with tin. For many centuries, bronze reigned supreme, being used for plows, tools of all kinds, weapons, armor, and decorative objects. Though copper came from the island of Cyprus-from whence its name-and numerous other sites in the Middle East, the origin of the tin in the bronze is still a mystery.

The Bronze Age suddenly ended at about 1200 BC, with the general collapse of the ancient world and the interruption of international trade routes. The supply of tin in particular dried up and the Iron Age was ushered in, not because iron was a superior material, but because it was widely available. The deliberate alloying of iron with carbon to form the first steels did not occur for centuries.

Economy in the use of copper and its alloys was necessitated by these early trade interruptions, and this efficiency in use and re-use has continued from that day to this.

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Feb18
0

Do You Know How to Sell Scrap Metal?

How To Scrap

Whether you are collecting scrap metal for income or as a hobby, understand that many lucrative scrap companies started out the same way. Collecting scrap metal pays pennies per pound, but it is not difficult to work up to weightier amounts if you know where to look for it. Keep in mind you need an area to store and sort your metal and a sturdy vehicle to haul it. You also need to make new business contacts.

Where to Look

Comb neighborhoods and put out fliers announcing your new business. Make friends with plumbers, building contractors, roofers and electricians. Visit machine shops and service stations. In some cities, the town dump is a freebie for the scrap collector. Keep an eye out for dumpsters and large trash containers near building sites. Find out what days metals are removed and ask if you could remove them. You may even make extra cash hauling unwanted items from businesses on a regular basis. Become familiar with the different types of metals, as some bring in higher prices than others. Sort the scrap according to type, as recyclers pay more when it is separated.

Hefty Items Add Up Fast

Water heaters are an easy source of metal, as many plumbers love having someone to haul them away. Although they do not pay much individually because they are mostly tin, you can accumulate them easily in lots of five or 10 at a time. Boilers, air conditioners and heaters are heavier items, sometimes weighing up to 300 pounds for a residential unit. They can be stripped of pricier metals, such as copper tubing and brass fittings, which can quickly add up. A large industrial boiler can weigh up to 700 pounds and must be dismantled for the metal recycler. Remove such things such as pressure gauges, as they can be sold in yard sales and can bring in some additional cash.

Instructions on how to identify and sort scrap metal

  1. Set out six large cardboard boxes to place items in and ease the sorting process. Label the recycleboxboxes as follows: iron, aluminum, batteries, brass, steel and copper. These are the six categories used by the scrap metal recycling industry.
  2. Start with the “Aluminum” box. Put things like soda and other cans, aluminum furniture, aluminum car pieces and storm doors in this box. Soda cans will likely be the easiest to find, but keep in mind, the idea is to go for more weight if you’re interested in making money off your recycling.
  3. Take a magnet and scan it over metal items. Place the items that have a magnetic attraction to the magnet in the “Iron” box. This is the quickest way to identify what pieces of metal are iron. Another option is to look for the formation of rust on the metal. Items that are usually made of iron include pipes, cars and pieces of home appliances.
  4. Look at all the remaining metal items and find the ones that have the appearance of iron without the magnetic pull. All of these items go straight to the “Stainless Steel” box. Items made of stainless steel include beer kegs, stair hand rails and vehicle trim.
  5. Gather any old car batteries you’ve found or have laying around and place them in the “Batteries” box. Car batteries are 100% recyclable and have many reusable parts including the plastic, lead and acid.
  6. Place metal items that are red or stained green from water damage in the “Copper” box. Copper is easy to obtain from things like old electrical wiring pieces, other wire and plumbing fittings.
  7. Place items that have a yellow-tinged color in the “Brass” bin. Brass items include door knobs, car radiators, sink drains and fixtures and light fixtures.

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